DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

PIMS-MITACS MATHEMATICAL BIOLOGY SEMINAR


MONDAY, January 17, 2005
3:00 - 4:00 p.m.
CAB 657

Dr. Kevin Hall
Laboratory of Biological Modeling
National Institutes of Health

Mathematical modeling of in vivo human energy metabolism and the regulation of body composition

Obesity has increased to epidemic proportions in North America and there is great public and scientific interest in the factors regulating body weight and, more importantly, body fat mass versus muscle mass. I will describe our mathematical model that integrates the input of dietary carbohydrate, fat, and protein and computes whole-body energy expenditure, nutrient oxidation rates, and major metabolic fluxes such as gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis. The goal of the model was to integrate a variety of in vivo metabolism data from humans and model how these factors quantitatively interact to give the resulting changes in body weight, fat mass, and lean mass observed during both positive and negative energy balance. The model accurately simulates body composition data from starving and re-fed humans and predicts the underlying long-term changes in nutrient oxidation and metabolic fluxes that are responsible for body composition regulation. I will also outline various potential uses of the model for the study of obesity and its treatment.